How do we combat the prevailing fear?

I’ve received several alerts since the Presidential campaign began warning that homeschooling was going to end as we know it if the country voted a certain way.   It seems that I’ve read similar alerts during and after many elections over the years.

There has also been a great deal in the news that could scare the hardiest of souls.   For two years we’ve heard the fear mongering from many different political campaigns.  The scare tactics continued  as the candidates slowly dwindled to the final choices we were presented with.

Many of us know all too well that  some of those alarms are based in reality.  All summer we’ve heard that credit has dried up, businesses are dropping left and right, jobs are lost, retirement funds are dwindling, doctors are thinking of leaving their practices, people are losing their homes and more.  I live in the rust belt, so a lot of what has come to the surface has been happening in our area for a while.    So what do we do with this fear that is growing due to these dire circumstances?  I can only speak for myself and know from personally dealing with difficulties, I take life one day at a time.    Under some extremely horrific circumstances, I have taken it one minute at a time, but I do know that the more informed I have been, the less consuming the fear has been.   Often the fear of the unknown is the most unsettling of all.   Assisting  those who are facing frightening circumstances often helps to lessen their fear and empower those helping them.     My philosophy tends to be to believe for the best, but be prepared for the worst. This helps us to do the best we can and live as simply as we are able.

Looking at the homeschool alarms from some who continue to claim that the President elect will end homeschooling as we know it reminds me of similar warnings I’ve read after most elections.    I do believe that we need to remain vigilant, that we should always be on  watch to ensure our rights are not taken, but I do  believe that we must investigate the threats ourselves to see if they are substantial or exaggerated.

With that said, I am concerned at how some churches and religious groups have reacted this time around.   It seems the fears that they were facing before the election are growing and I am worried that their fears will continue to divide us rather than unite us.  For example,  I don’t ever recall churches proclaiming  that if you voted a certain way you were no longer or couldn’t ever have been a member of a certain faith?  Nor do I recall church members being told they could not partake in that churches communion if you voted for a particular person, but I have been reading about both these scenarios since the election.   I don’t understand these actions as they don’t seem to line up with what my King James Bible says to do concerning our elected officials.  It reads:

1 Timothy 2:1, 2

I exhort therefore, that, first of all, supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks, be made for all men;

For kings, and for all that are in authority; that we may lead a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and honesty.

Again, I’m a pretty simple person.  I want to live a peaceable life with my family.  I  believe that light dispels darkness and that love overcomes fear.   I believe the challenges our country is facing  are bi-partisan and would have continued no matter who was elected.    My simple mind keeps telling me that we need a lot more love and a lot less fear to get us through these tough times.

2 thoughts on “How do we combat the prevailing fear?

  1. Mary, this is well-said. There is a big difference between fearfulness and maintaining vigilance, but some would have us see them as the same thing. Thanks for your *simple* message.

  2. What a lovely, humble and wise response to all the condemnation that has poured out during this lengthy election season. I’m concerned about the hostility promoted by talk radio and certain groups with an agenda. Even more saddened when religion is used to promote divisiveness.

    When we find common ground with people whose lifestyles and beliefs differ from ours we can work together for the greatest good. This brings forth the best in humanity. After all, fear and aggression springs from the more primitive part of the brain, an area known as the “reptilian brain” Choosing these negative responses to the turmoil of our times is literally lower level behavior. When, instead, we seek understanding, show compassion and express willingness to cooperate we are using our highest capabilities. These times call for the best in each of us.

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